Roofing Midtown Detroit

Midtown Detroit is a mixed-use area with a business district, a cultural center, a major research university, and a few residential neighborhoods. It is north of Downtown Detroit and south of the New Center area. It is on the east and west sides of Woodward Avenue. The Chrysler Freeway (I-75) on the east, the Lodge Freeway (M-10) on the west, the Edsel Ford Freeway (I-94) on the north, and the Fisher Freeway (I-75) on the south define the neighborhood community area. Several historic districts, the Detroit Medical Center, and Wayne State University are all in the area.

The Midtown area is a general mixed-use community area made up of neighborhoods. Since it was first laid out, the area has been changed many times by new waves of development. Woodward Avenue, which runs north to south through the middle of Midtown, is the main street in the neighborhoods. This neighborhood used to be called Cass Corridor, and many people in Detroit still call it that.

In the middle of the neighborhood, where Woodward Avenue runs north to south, most of the businesses, public/cultural institutions, and religious buildings are located. In the northern part of Midtown, right on Woodward, are the Detroit Public Library and the Detroit Institute of Arts, which make up the cultural center.

Wayne State University’s campus takes up almost all of the northwest part of Midtown north of Warren Avenue and west of Woodward Avenue. This area is in the north of Midtown, west of Woodward Avenue. The 203-acre Wayne State University campus is in the northwest corner of Midtown. Parts of Wayne’s campus go south of Warren and north of I-94, out of Midtown and into the neighborhood of New Center. The athletic facilities for Wayne are also west of the Lodge Freeway. Wayne is one of the three research universities in Michigan. It has more than 32,000 students.

The Detroit Medical College, which opened in 1868, was the first part of what would become Wayne State University. In 1881, the school of education opened. Old Main was built in 1896 as Central High School in Detroit. In 1913, college classes were added, and in 1917, the Liberal Arts classes turned into what is now known as Detroit Junior College. In 1923, the school started giving four-year degrees, and in 1930, graduate courses were added. In 1933, the colleges that had been run by different people came together to form Wayne University. The school changed its name to Wayne State University in 1956.

South of Wayne State University, the North Cass neighborhood has a lot of apartment buildings, many of which are mixed in with older single-family homes. Wayne State’s growth has had a big impact on this area. Part of WSU’s campus has moved into the northern part of North Cass, and many of the residential homes have been taken over by Wayne students.